BREXIT – The State of Play for Citizens’ Rights [UPDATED]

[This post has been updated to reflect the release of the UK government’s Statement of Intent on the EU Settlement Scheme on 21 June 2018.]

When it comes to Brexit, one of the EU27’s core negotiating principles, as set out in the European Council’s April 2017 negotiating guidelines, is that “nothing is agreed until everything is agreed”. As of now, there is no legally binding withdrawal agreement between the UK government and the EU27, and so any statements from either side are positions or proposals, subject to further negotiation.

Here we look at the UK government’s and the EU27’s policy positions on citizens’ rights today, and how they got to this point. We then suggest some actions that those affected should consider taking in light of these negotiating positions.

Read more here:

BREXIT – The State of Play for Citizens’ Rights [UPDATED]

The information in this alert was provided by Newland Chase.

 

BREXIT – The State of Play for Citizens’ Rights

Here we look at the UK government’s and the EU27’s policy positions on citizens’ rights today, and how they got to this point. We then suggest some actions that those affected should consider taking in light of these negotiating positions.

Read more here:

BREXIT – The State of Play for Citizens’ Rights

 

UNITED KINGDOM – Statement of Changes to the Immigration Rules Affects Family Immigration

On 20 July 2017, the UK government published a Statement of Changes to the Immigration Rules, made in order to comply with the Supreme Court judgment in MM (Lebanon) & Others, which ruled that the Home Office must take into account alternative sources of funding when deciding whether to grant entry clearance or leave to remain as a partner or child under the family Immigration Rules in Appendix FM.

The changes will take effect on Thursday 10 August 2017 and will apply to all decisions taken on and after that date, regardless of when the application was made.

Read more here:

UNITED KINGDOM – Statement of Changes to the Immigration Rules Affects Family Immigration

The information in this alert was provided by Newland Chase.

Peregrine, a CIBT company, builds software and provides consultancy and training for global immigration management.

Newland Chase, also a CIBT company, provides specialist immigration services worldwide.

CIBT is a world leader in short-term outbound visa requirements for expats and businesses.

CANADA – Government Eliminates Conditional Permanent Residence for Certain Spouses and Revises Age Threshold for Dependents

Effective 28 April, 2017, the Government of Canada has removed the condition that applied to some sponsored spouses or partners of Canadian citizens and permanent residents to live with their sponsor for two years in order to keep their permanent resident status.

Effective 24 October 2017, the Canadian government will reset the age of dependency back to “under 22”.

Read more here:

CANADA – Government Eliminates Conditional Permanent Residence for Certain Spouses and Revises Age Threshold for Dependents

This alert was prepared using information provided by Kranc Associates and the Government of Canada.

LUXEMBOURG – New Immigration Law Bring Extensive Changes

Luxembourg’s new immigration law entered into force on 24 March 2017, introducing several new residence permit categories, including the new EU ICT permit, along with other changes of significance for non-EU nationals.

The Official Gazette of 20 March 2017 published the Law of 8 March 2017 amending and supplementing the Immigration Law of 29 August 2008.

Read more here:

This news alert was prepared using information provided by Osch & Arendt and LuxRelo.

BELGIUM – Integration Law Published [UPDATED]

Effective 18 February 2017, a new law requires certain residence permit applicants to submit a signed “newcomers statement” in support of their application and to provide evidence of their integration efforts in order to maintain or renew their residency status.

[UPDATE] The “Integration Act” was originally published on 16 January 2017, and was due to take effect ten days later, on 26 January 2017. However, it was republished on 8 February 2017, and will therefore take effect on 18 February 2017. The “newcomers statement” is not likely to come into effect on that date, however, as the text has not yet been finalised.

It remains unclear whether the new obligations will apply to first residence applications (“newcomers”) only, or also to renewals (foreign nationals already residing in Belgium). Guidelines from the authorities will have to clarify how the new rules will be applied in practice.

Read more here:

This news alert was prepared using information provided by Praetica.

BELGIUM – Integration Law Takes Effect

Effective 26 January 2017, a new law requires certain residence permit applicants to submit a signed “newcomers statement” in support of their application and to provide evidence of their integration efforts in order to maintain or renew their residency status.

Read more here:

This news alert was prepared using information provided by Praetica.